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The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast

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Now displaying: May, 2019
May 27, 2019

The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast

Ep 118: Planning a Yoga Conference with Allison Rissel

 

Description:

If you’ve ever attended a yoga conference, you can imagine how much time, money and effort goes into it. But how do you get started planning, marketing and executing such an event? What are some do’s and don’ts of planning a yoga conference? Allison Rissel, joins Shannon on this episode to dive into the nitty gritty of planning a yoga conference.

 

Allison became a yoga teacher in 2006, and uses her master’s degree in Exercise Science alongside her extensive anatomy and biomechanics training to work with a variety of clients. However, her passion lies in training yoga teachers to create their own yoga communities. She does this by offering yoga teacher trainings and a range of services to help yoga teachers bring their yoga conference dreams to life.

 

On this episode, Allison reveals all the things that go on behind-the-scenes in planning and executing a yoga conference. From the schedule of events at the conference, to marketing strategies to promote and advertise the conference, to hard lessons learned along the way - Allison shares all her insight and experience.

 

Whether you’re contemplating planning a yoga conference, or want to know how to become a vendor or teacher to make new connections within the yoga community and expand your reach, this interview is full of actionable tips you can put to use immediately.

 

Key Takeaways:

[3:40] Shannon introduces her guest for this episode - Allison Rissel

[5:10] What does Allison do, and who does she serve?

[8:18] What in Allison's background enabled her to feel empowered to create her first yoga conference?

[9:53] When did Allison host the first North Dakota Yoga Conference? How did it turn out?

[11:30] How long did it take for Allison to plan for the event? How long did she advertise the event?

[13:17] How many teachers did Allison have sharing at the conference? What was the schedule like for the conference?

[15:12] Who were the attendees at the yoga conference?

[16:32] What has Allison learned along the way?

[19:29] What did Allison change or implement in her business after her consultation call with Shannon?

[23:58] Allison breaks down some of the numbers from her conferences.

[25:26] How does Allison ensure that 75% of the conference participants have signed up by the end of the Early Bird promotion?

[27:30] Shannon and Allison discuss Bismarck, North Dakota.

[29:27] What does Allison's preparation look like the week before the conference?

[33:37] What is Allison doing during the conference?

[35:36] How does Allison theme her conference?

[37:52] Allison explains more about how she attracts teachers, vendors and participants to her conference.

[39:30] How did Allison manage to turn a profit in the first year of running the conference?

[42:08] Allison shares how the conference acts as the top of her funnel.

[43:25] Find out more about Allison's yoga conference in 2019 by visiting her website.

[45:58] Share a conference you love, or any questions you have for Allison!

 

Links:

 

Gratitude to our Sponsor Schedulicity

 

Quotes from this episode:

 

"I saw the impact that yoga had, and that yoga teacher trainings were having in the towns I was at, and it was incredible, and I really wanted to spread that across the whole state."

 

"I saw the impact that yoga and yoga teacher trainings were having in the towns I visited. It was incredible and I really wanted to spread that across the whole state." (revised Sam)

 

"I don't know if it's something I could have done by myself, but having two other team mates really helped motivate me and really helped bring this whole dream to reality."

 

"The biggest thing I wish I would have known beforehand is how much time and money is really involved."

 

"I want to make other teachers feel really empowered and start their own businesses."

 

"No matter how well you plan, that week before, something's going to go wrong and there's going to be a lot of work to do."

May 20, 2019

The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast

116: Pain Language with Shelly Prosko (Part 2)

 

Description:

How important is communication and language when working with yoga students, especially those who are dealing with persistent (chronic) pain? The answer is - extremely. We don't want our yoga students to become fearful of movement, or trigger a pain response with our cues or tone.This episode is a continuation of the conversation from last week with Shelly Prosko on the topic of pain language in yoga.

 

Shelly is a physiotherapist, yoga therapist, author, international speaker and educator with over 20 years of experience in the field. She is also a Pain Care Yoga Trainer, and works to expand knowledge and education on topics surrounding persistent (chronic) pain, pelvic health, compassion and professional burnout. She is currently co-authoring the textbook, Yoga and Science in Pain Care: Treating the Person in Pain.

 

On the previous episode, Shelly shared cues that empower our yoga students instead of using cues that instill fear of movement. This week, Shannon and Shelly discuss the importance of self-compassion and the language we can use around that, as well as

how we can make yoga "safe" - both by creating safe spaces and through the use of our language. Shelly shares more about the topics covered in her upcoming book, and why alignment is so important as a part of yoga.

 

This conversation is such an eye-opener and will surely provide you with a new perspective on language, how we communicate with cues in a yoga class, and how it all ties in to the way we serve our yoga students who are dealing with persistent pain.

 

Key Takeaways:

[3:50] Shannon introduces her guest for this episode - Shelly Prosko.

[4:35] Shelly shares more about the idea of having self-compassion and the language around that.

[6:21] What is an example of how someone might practice self-compassion?

[11:27] As a yoga teacher, you want to help people find their own luxurious experience.

[17:32] What is Shelly's book about?

[20:36] What is "safe" yoga, and how can we achieve it?

[27:19] Shelly breaks down the different aspects of language that we should be mindful of.

[31:49] Shelly speaks more about the power of intention and visualization.

[35:11] Shelly briefly touches on the topic of alignment in yoga.

[43:08] Find out more about Shelly via her website, social media and YouTube.

[44:11] Join the conversation by leaving a comment or joining our Live Q&A call.

 

Links:

 

Gratitude to our Sponsor Schedulicity

 

Quotes from this episode:

"I just would like to encourage people if they're interested to learn more about self-compassion and the language surrounding that, and then that will help you cue."

 

"As a yoga teacher, you want to help people find their own luxurious experience."

 

"The big question is well, how do you create a safe space? We talk about that a lot but how do you do it?"

 

"Let's cue alignment, but let's cue it to give [the students] a variable experience.”

May 13, 2019

The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast

116: Pain Language with Shelly Prosko (Part 1)

 

Description:

When people turn to yoga in search of healing, they often carry with them a lot of pain. As yoga teachers, it can be challenging and frustrating to know which words to choose when communicating with our students and giving cues, particularly for those who are dealing with persistent (chronic) pain. In part one of this two-part interview, Shelly Prosko joins Shannon to talk about this topic in a way that makes it playful and fun.

 

Shelly is a physiotherapist, yoga therapist, author, international speaker and educator with over 20 years of experience in the field. She is also a Pain Care Yoga Trainer, and works to expand knowledge and education on topics surrounding persistent (chronic) pain, pelvic health, compassion and professional burnout. She is currently co-authoring the textbook, Yoga and Science in Pain Care: Treating the Person in Pain.

 

Shannon and Shelly discuss the concepts of pain and some of the science behind pain  (hint: it’s not a ‘thing’, it’s a phenomenon and an experience!). When guiding a yoga class, some words we use innocently may either be empowering or triggering - Shelly shares more about some words to avoid, and her suggestions for alternatives.

 

This episode is full of Shelly’s tips and strategies for being more aware of language when guiding a yoga class. Whether you’re teaching a trauma-informed yoga class or just want to be more conscious of how your language can trigger and alleviate pain responses, you’re sure to learn something you can apply to your own classes right away.

 

Key Takeaways:

[4:43] Shannon introduces her guest for this episode - Shelly Prosko.

[5:36] What got Shelly interested in the topic of pain language?

[9:58] Shelly explains the connotations of 'chronic' pain vs 'persistent' pain.

[13:09] It's important to have self compassion and not get too caught up or stressed about always choosing the right words.

[15:39] What do the terms 'neuroplasticity' and 'bioplasticity' mean?

[19:03] When people get overwhelmed with language, they shut down - that's why it's important to keep conversations about language playful and exploratory.

[21:16] How can language turn someone around from their negative pain story into sometime more empowering? Shelly shares an example.

[25:23] How does Shelly approach changing the language used around pain - through explanations, or a gradual shift in language?

[29:27] What are some of Shelly's cue considerations around pain language?

[34:31] Shelly shares some alternatives that she prefers to use in giving cues.

[43:23] What are some other "dos-and-don'ts" when it comes to communicating in your yoga class?

[48:51] What is your main takeaway from this interview? Share your thoughts!

 

Links:

 

Gratitude to our Sponsor Schedulicity

 

Quotes from this episode:

 

"For people in pain, that have been suffering from persistent pain or chronic pain for a long time, there can be certain changes in the brain and the nervous system that makes the nervous system more hypervigilant, ... or more sensitive."

 

"We have to also respect the lived experience of pain, meaning what are people in pain saying?"

 

"Our whole being potentially has the capacity for change."

 

"Pain is the output of the human."

 

"The output of the brain is the pain experience, and pain is not a thing. It's a phenomenon, it's an experience."

 

"With the giving the permission, just be cognizant about are we creating an environment that gives people the sense of safety, confidence and the courage."

 

"You don't have to tell people what to do or what they should be doing. You're just providing this experience, you're more their guide."

 

May 6, 2019

The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast

115: The Polyvagal Theory and Yoga with Dr. Ginger Garner

 

Description:

 

We all know that communication and language are important in a yoga class. But it’s not just about giving instructions and guidance about breathing or poses - it’s also how we communicate. The timber and volume of our voices, music or chanting in the class, even certain words, can have an effect on other people, but also ourselves, and it creates an internal response for both parties. This is all part of the polyvagal theory, and Dr. Ginger Garner joins Shannon on this episode to explain how this theory can influence how we teach, communicate and hold space as yoga teachers.

 

Dr. Garner is a trained doctor of physical therapy, licensed athletic trainer, professional yoga therapist, published author, and renowned educator. She strongly believes that health and healthcare should be approached holistically, and founded the Professional Yoga Therapy Institute®, the first yoga therapy certification for healthcare providers in the world.

 

The polyvagal theory, the wandering nerve, the use of sound, music, cues and communication in a yoga class, chronic pain - Shannon and Dr. Garner dive deep into these topics and more. Dr. Garner shares examples from her multi-decade career about the use of polyvagal theory in treating chronic pain, and highlights some tools yoga teachers can put into practice in their own classes.

 

Whether you want to improve how you communicate with your yoga students, or be more aware of the impact and influence something as simple as your voice could be having on your yoga classes, this episode is full of great information.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:56] Shannon introduces her guest for this episode - Dr. Ginger Garner

[4:17] What got Dr. Garner into yoga, and what was her first experience with yoga like?

[6:49] What is the main work that Dr. Garner does?

[9:14] What is the polyvagal theory?

[15:33] The polyvagal theory involves the vagus nerve, which Dr. Garner calls the wandering nerve. Why is it called that?

[21:28] How does polyvagal theory apply to how yoga teachers cue and communicate in a class?

[24:00] What does it look like when yoga teachers are trying to create that safe space?

[27:14] In what way can yoga teachers use sound in their classes to affect vagal tone?

[28:39] Shannon and Dr. Garner discuss eustress and distress and some examples.

[30:56] Dr. Garner explains how sounding would play out in a yoga class.

[33:26] What could be therapeutic for someone may be disassociating for someone else. Dr. Garner highlights some examples of this.

[37:43] What does breathwork have to do with the nervous system?

[43:19] Shannon shares an anecdote about her student who was suffering from chronic pain.

[44:06] People can get stuck in a circle of chronic pain, and then turn to yoga as a means of breaking that cycle.

[46:08] What are some tools that Dr. Garner suggests to overcome negative pattern?

[55:15] Why do we forget to breathe in a way that helps us?

[1:01:25] Shannon and Dr. Garner discuss the importance of integration of fields of study for more effective treatment.

[1:03:53] Find out more about Dr. Garner and the work she does by visiting her websites - links below.

[1:06:27] Shannon shares her biggest takeaways from this interview.



Links:

 

Gratitude to our Sponsor Schedulicity

 

Quotes from this episode:

 

"How I use yoga, how I use polyvagal theory, how it all comes together is to create a safe space for people who are in a lot of pain."

 

"When I'm teaching yoga teachers or I'm teaching healthcare providers to use yoga, ... I want them to be able to create a therapeutic landscape that is conducive to creating safety for that person."

 

"Sound can be a trigger, but it also can be a eustress, a positive stressor."

 

"Using sound as therapy and music as medicine is in its infancy still."

 

"Our biomedical system is quite broken."

 

"[Yoga] alone doesn't fix it, and [surgery] alone doesn't fix it, but together, it will. It can."

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